Snow, rice, and the people of Echigo. Brewing sake here on this land.

“The county of Uonuma, where I live, is the place with the heaviest snow in Japan,”

-wrote Uonuma-born essayist Bokushi Suzuki in his great book, “Hokuetsu-seppu.”
This heaviest snow in Japan seeps into the ground with the approach of the budding season. After hundreds of years it turns into groundwater and springs out from the well in the storehouse of Kakurei. Mother water used for sake brewing determines the taste of sake. The water in Uonuma is soft, which is best suited to create the “tanrei-umakuchi (light & tasty)” taste that Kakurei aims for.

The water that wells out like the snow falling from the winter sky…this water is “the gift from the land,” the life of Kakurei.

Just like the tough life in the snowy region described in “Hokuetsu-seppu,” the people in Uonuma have lived patiently enduring heavy snow and coldness by willingly helping each other during winter. The “spirit of enduring” and “the spirit of cooperation” have nurtured the superior physical and mental characteristics unique to the people in Niigata.

“The gift from the land,” “spirit of enduring,” and “spirit of cooperation.” Kakurei is a Japanese sake made by the climate of Uonuma and the relationships among people.